Once More


I have missed writing for Poise and Presence! And so….here’s a post written on returning from a recent workshop.

It was a winter Saturday afternoon at Ohio University’s Alexander Technique Audition Workshop. Singers were delighted with the resonant, full, and free sounds emerging from their mouths. The primary question was, ‘How do I keep this?’

The answer? ‘You don’t.’ Attempts to keep,  codify, cement, solidify; all fail. Why? Because they require stasis, and fine singing with good use requires movement and change.

Then. If it isn’t possible to keep a glorious sound forever, what are the options? For starters, come back to the present moment in which you find yourself. The magnificent singing is over, but this moment is yours. Claim it. Get out of your head, out of the loop which is replaying the past, that past when you sang your best ever. It’s gone. The sound waves have moved on.

Utilize the magnificent power of your cognition to think well in present time. Alright. Back here. Back to now. Returning to feet in my pink velvet heels. (Yes, a student was wearing a pair. Loved them!) Inviting length and width, merely by thinking of them.

And about those habits of use: right arm pulling in toward ribs, torso torquing to the left, thorax over-arched and off-balance with the pelvis. Note them, and be inquisitive. What might happen if you simply stop with the arm pull, the torquing torso, the over-arching spine?  What if there is no attempt to fix, but rather a decision to ‘NOT DO’?

Then sing. Watch. Observe. Feel. Fully engage yourself in the experimentation that is required to hone your singing craft. You’ll produce yet another glorious sound, particular to this moment.

Thank you, Ohio University vocalists. It was a lovely afternoon. Always give yourself one more chance. Once more, with feeling! Once more with presence, and yes, poise.


Signing Off


2017 will soon be a wrap, and with it this blog. First posting was March 2016, and that’s a good long run. In 2017 alone, Poise and Presence had readers from 50 countries, almost 2,000 visits, and 42 followers.

The plan is to pull the blog contents off wordpress, followed by editing and reformulating postings. Who knows; I may publish a chapbook. Other 2018 writing projects include condensing 5 decades of journals onto a flash drive and also writing an account of my maternal ancestors’ 1834 migration from Virginia to southern Ohio’s Lawrence County. It’s a fascinating story for the nieces and nephews!

It’s been a pleasure writing to you each week, and exploring the intersection of the Alexander Technique and daily life. May you continue to pursue your interest in the Technique and make its principles and practices an integral part of your days—-

pixabay graphic

The Alexander Technique and Pain


A routine skin check at my dermatologist office becomes a surgical intervention on Monday morning. A growth is removed for biopsy. No worries, just caution! The procedure itself involved a beautiful silver miniature scalpel,  with which Dr. C. gouged out a crater.  I exaggerate, but only slightly.

The injection of a numbing solution caused the startle reflex, and one of the nurses in attendance was kind enough to place a calming hand on my shoulder. I was then happily oblivious to pain until its effects began to wear off.

On the way to the pharmacy, I experienced searing pain. Observing the pain and my reactions to it allowed me to co-exist with the discomfort. My perception widened to include the whole of my physical self, my thoughts about the pain, and the aisles down which I walked to select my purchases.

Did the pain diminish? No. What changed was my relationship to it. I attribute this habit of mind, that of self-observation, directly to an on-going Alexander Technique practice. Startle, downward pull, contraction, one-pointed focus; all are responses to pain which can be ameliorated with attention.

And then the Advil did its job, taking the edge off the pain. What a team!  AT and Advil.

pixabay graphic




Alexander Technique Constructive Rest


Greetings, dear readers! The season of flurry and fuss is upon us and a few Alexander Technique ‘words-of-wisdom’ are in order. Let’s re-visit the benefits of Constructive Rest. Changing your relationship to gravity, even if only for a few minutes during the day, can have restorative effects.

This change happens when you lie down on your back, feet on the floor or yoga mat, hands comfortably at your sides or resting on your chest. Choose a firm surface, and prop a thin paperback book or two under your head. That’s it. You have given yourself a little present. And as you return to uprightness for your day, CR is truly ‘the-gift-that-keeps-on-giving.’

If you’d like to get fancy, you can, while lying prone, also give yourself a couple of prompts. “My neck is free.’ Or—-‘I allow my spine to lengthen and my torso to widen.’  Activate your kinesthetic sense by giving your attention to the places where your body is in contact with the surface on which you are lying.

And then, it’s on to the business at hand, with light in your eyes, and a lilt to your step!

pixabay photo–adorable!

Alexander Technique Teaching


Rescuers transport dogs from disaster areas to safety. Rescuers placed themselves in danger to save those caught in the fury of California wildfires.  And then there is this rescuer of vintage and antique dishware, found at yard sales, thrift shops and yes, curbside trash piles.

The desire to rescue is a strong one, whether it be puppies, people, or vintage dishes. As an Alexander Technique teacher, I do battle with this powerful impulse, because rescuing is the last thing I ought to be doing with my students. And here lies the paradox: I wish to help my students but will only interfere with their learning if rescue is what I try to do.

Instead, the task of the teacher is to practice good use of oneself and permit the lesson to take its course.  Always I have a plan.  But, I have learned that in being present to myself and to my student, the lesson plan becomes a springboard to what really needs to happen. Rescue? NO! Attentive and aware? YES!

(pixabay photo)


Practicing The Pause

Long may she wave. Thanks, pixabay.

In our present political/societal climate, the stimulus of blaring headlines is powerful and the impulse to track news stories throughout the day overwhelmingly compelling.

And here is where I can practice The Pause. I did it just a few moments ago, when sitting down to my office computer. It’s Election Day. Wondering how the polls are being attended, I almost chose to go down the News Story Rabbit Hole.

But didn’t, choosing instead to access my wordpress site and do some writing. Here I am, with you, instead of  with the endless news cycle. Yes! This is what practicing The Pause is all about. We catch ourselves in a habitual response, and with a slight pause, we can then choose what is best for us in this moment.





Cory Taylor’s book was recommended by a local librarian, after I told her I was looking for a good read, and appreciate a well-written memoir. What a gift, public libraries!

As a person viewing the world through an Alexander Technique lens, I am always on the look-out for well-expressed descriptions of what Mr. A. called The Self, the body/mind in which we each reside. Taylor provided an excellent one. She is writing about her childhood experience of body and consciousness:

I never thought of my body at that time as something separate from the bodies of the dog, or the kookaburra, or the mother cat up in my sister’s sock drawer. And I certainly didn’t think of my body as separate from my consciousness. They were one and the same thing, consciousness being a bodily sensation, just like sight, or touch, or hearing.’

We study the Alexander Technique to recover our childhood connectivity to the natural world, and to restore our body/mind integration. It’s a return to our inherent structure and our place on the planet, and does not require adding on something new.  May your Alexander Technique practice bring you the poise of your youth today—–